Tuesday, January 16, 2018

What RDs Do: Mary Purdy MS, RDN

MARY PURDY
ARIVALE & MARY'S NUTRITION SHOW
for something nutrishus


Mary is doing a variety of interesting things. She came to dietetics later in life and now works with both individuals and reaches a large audience via her show and podcasts. She's a great example of how dietitians turn research into practical advice. Like Mary, I jumped right into the private practice world, having never had a traditional job. I love the thought that went into her responses and am excited to read her book (since she kindly sent me a copy)!

Why did you become a RD? 

I have always been interested in food, health and nutrition since I was a little girl. I originally chose to become an actor but never lost my passion and zeal for broccoli and pomegranates. I started questioning this career choice in my early 30’s just as my dad was diagnosed with a very serious disease that wound him in a hospital where he received some very questionable advice from the dietitian there. When I began to realize that food actually had the power to help prevent and address disease I knew that I had to switch gears and do whatever I could to help people who may be in need of nutritional guidance. I was determined to heal the world one meal at a time!

What area of dietetics do you work in? 

I work at the start up scientific wellness company called Arivale in Seattle, as a Registered Dietitian Coach and Clinical Education Lead. I also host a web series and podcast called “Mary’s Nutrition Show” with my husband, who is a videographer and lead producer, all around great guy and fellow broccoli enthusiast.

How would you explain what you do? 

I work with clients/patients over the phone providing diet and lifestyle counseling utilizing a personalized medicine approach which takes into account nutritional genetics, blood analyte biomarkers, microbiome and salivary cortisol. We take a long-term, integrative approach where we address diet, physical activity, stress, sleep, and supplementation. What is incredible is that we work with folks long enough to gather data that helps us to see how our intervention strategies have made a difference in their lives. I also act as an educator at the company, training our new hires and helping to build new trainings on a variety of topics for our current dietitians. For “Mary’s Nutrition Show”, we produce weekly shows either on Facebook Live or recorded for a podcast that provide easy to understand information on a myriad of food and nutrition topics that are usually sprinkled with a lot of humor to keep it fun and interesting for both listener and for me.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks? 

Because Arivale is a start up culture, every day is incredibly different. I spend a lot of time reaching out to and speaking to, texting or emailing my clients keeping them accountable as well as inspired and encouraged, and fielding questions from them on a regular basis. I hold clinical office hours where other RDN’s can pick my brain about tough cases. I attend trainings about new data, go to meetings about company updates, group gatherings around both clinical or personal topics, drink copious amounts of tea and have brief chats with other RDN’s in our kitchen area, and read a lot of research. For Mary’s Nutrition Show, I brainstorm show ideas, stay current on social media, practice talking points, respond to comments and queries and go to the grocery store often where I can try new products that I can be confident recommending to my listeners.


What has been your career path? 

After attaining my graduate degree in nutrition and finishing my internship at Bastyr University, I decided it would be a good idea to hang my shingle and go into private practice, even with no real business experience. (I don’t recommend this!) I had never had a normal job, so the thought of a 9-5 gig was very unappealing. The internship schedule almost killed me. I wanted autonomy. I started off in what might be thought of as a utility closet at a gym and gradually worked my way to an office with windows and a couch. I also got a part time job for two years as an outpatient dietitian at a hospital in Seattle which filled in the gaps very nicely. I also started providing wellness presentations at local businesses and community centers and began to build my brand as a private practice dietitian.

While keeping my business going, I took on another wonderful role as a Clinical Supervisor at Bastyr University’s Teaching clinic for 5 years and became adjunct faculty teaching in both the natural medicine and nutrition departments for 3 years. When the opportunity came up to work at Arivale with a team of amazing clinicians and founded by one of the founding fathers of systems biology, Lee Hood, I decided to close my private practice and take a chance on this amazing-sounding start up. I have never looked back and look forward to every day that I get to practice integrative medicine and learn from other health professionals, and drink copious amounts of tea while chatting with other RDN’s in the kitchen. Over the past few years, I have been writing humorous personal essays about becoming and being a dietitian and finally compiled them all into a book called “Serving the Broccoli Gods”

What advanced education or special training do you have? 

I am definitely a life long learner who for the past 10 years has listened to dozens of professional webinars and attended several different major conferences and symposiums every year that mostly focus on functional and integrative approaches to health. I took the Functional Nutrition Course through the Institute for Functional Medicine, and the Food as Medicine professional training courses through the Center for Mind-Body Medicine. Being on the executive committee and now the Chair of Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine has also afforded me numerous opportunities to build my knowledge base. I will never stop pursuing learning opportunities especially when the field is so incredibly dynamic. I just hope my brain can hold all the info!

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now? 

I hope the world of dietetics will be more aligned and less divided on a variety of topics. Or if the division still exists, I hope there is a cordial agreement to respect the others’ opinions. I also hope food policy won’t be so driven by food industry. I fear that decisions around our food – both access and quality – are often being made by organizations that may not always have the consumer’s health in mind. I would love for RDN’s to have greater respect overall in the medical community as an integral part of the health care picture. I also hope that more RDN’s feel empowered to take an integrative approach to nutritional counseling, incorporating other aspects of what constitutes “health” and come to understand the value of personalizing the strategies, and that not all research may apply to every single person in the same way. And I hope that this is taught and incorporated into nutrition school curriculums and in medical schools. Filling out the conversation with our patients to include sleep, stress, GI (gastrointestinal) issues, environment, genetics, physical activity, and the benefits or lack thereof of supplementation will inevitably make our ability to guide and improve health outcomes all the stronger.


What are challenges you encounter as a RD? 

I don’t think people, my friends and acquaintances included, or other medical professionals always understand the depth of our knowledge and training around food and disease and how strong our understanding is of how to prevent, treat and in some cases possibly even reverse chronic health issues.

What do people think that you do for a living? 

I think some believe that I sit there and tell people to stop eating fast food and eat more vegetables so they can lose weight. I don’t think they understand that food is information for our genes and helps to support our bodies’ biochemical functions, and that decisions around meals go way beyond calories in and calories out.

What are you passionate about in dietetics? 

I am extraordinarily passionate about the potential that a food as medicine approach has in stopping chronic disease. I love the idea of thinking outside the box with strategies, with trialing options with patients and considering n=1 experiments as a way to determine if the intervention is right for that individual. When we start focusing on the root cause of disease and begin our guidance from that perspective, we have the ability to dig deep and understand how to get us out of the health crisis in which we have found ourselves.

What is your favourite meal? 

Do I have to have a favorite? It depends on the season, on my mood, where I am, but I do love a good Spicy Indian or Thai veggie curry over brown rice, or vegetarian chili bursting with veggies and a side of corn bread. But then I also go nuts for a massaged kale salad with avocado and walnuts and beets! Give me flavor, richness, spice and color. Can I have that many favorites??

What tip(s) would you give to our readers? 

Don’t NOT do something because you are scared or worried that you won’t be successful. Don’t stay too long doing something in the field that doesn’t fill your soul. Stay open minded about the possibilities of this field and keep up the dialogue with those who may have different philosophies from yours. This is a great way to learn.

More about Mary:

Website: Mary Purdy
YouTube channel: Mary Purdy
Facebook: Mary Purdy RD
Twitter: @marypurdyhere
Instagram: @marypurdyrd




Thanks Mary! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!



Tuesday, January 9, 2018

What RDs Do: Deanne Segrave-Daly, RD

DEANNA SEGRAVE-DALY
TEASPOON COMMUNICATIONS
for something nutrishus


I've known of Deanna and Serena for years now. They are the type of private practice dietitians that came to mind when I started this series and also served as business inspiration for me. Deanna is very active online and always sharing delicious recipes as well as kitchen hacks for practical healthy cooking at home. Interestingly, we both started communications work with our local dairy groups.

Why did you become a RD?

I became interested in nutrition myself when I gained weight at college and started looking into healthier eating habits. And I’ve always loved cooking and the culture surrounding food.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

Communications/Social Media/Blogging

How would you explain what you do?

For the past 9 years, I’ve co-owned a food-focused communications business called Teaspoon Communications with my business partner, Serena Ball. We work with a variety of food companies, PR agencies and commodity groups doing everything from recipes development, to social media outreach, to TV spots to article writing to creating presentations.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

Daily/weekly tasks include online- promoting healthy recipes, kitchen tips, nutrition finds, etc. on my social media handles as well as keeping our blog, Teaspoon of Spice running smoothly.

On any given week, I could be working on preparing for a Facebook live spot, shooting a Healthy Kitchen Hacks video, hosting a recipe contest through The Recipe ReDux (a blogger community I co-own and manage with Serena and Regan Jones) or planning for Blog Brulee (an annual dietitian blogger workshop that I co-founded with Regan, Robin Plotkin and Gretchen Brown.)

What has been your career path?

From the start I knew I didn’t want to be a clinical dietitian so I started in the community/education sector working for WIC and then being an outpatient dietitian at a prenatal clinic. Then I was hired by my local dairy council to do communications and PR work which I loved. I worked there for 9 years – between that job and being involved in the Food & Culinary Professionals DPG of AND is what gave me the experience and confidence to start my own business with two other colleagues (Serena and Bonnie Johnson) in 2009.

What advanced education or special training do you have?

Along with a BS in Nutrition, I have a BS in Marketing.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

I wish I had that crystal ball! Communication wise, I know social media outlets will continue to be the main source of news for consumers and I think everything will be in video or live format (vs. photos or simply reading.)

More about Deanna:

Blog: Teaspoon of Spice
Facebook: Teaspoon of Spice
Twitter: tspbasil
Pinterest: tspbasil
Instagram: tsp_basil
LinkedIn: Deanna Segrave-Daly




Thanks Deanna! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

What RDs Do: Caitlin Boudreau, RD, MPH

CAITLIN BOUDREAU 
PEDIATRICS & ONCOLOGY;
CHILD & FAMILY DIETITIAN
for something nutrishus


I knew Caitlin online as Wee Nourish before I knew her actual name, which reminds me of being introduced to other dietitians at conferences as Nutrishus RD or the something nutrishus dietitian. Career paths often intrigue me, as dietitians have various reasons for finding different roles and this applies to Caitlin as explained below. I also love learning unique new things about them, such as their second language or favourite food/meal.

Why did you become a RD? 

I think I was drawn to the practicality of nutrition. Coming from a psychology background, I’ve always been interested in food and people’s eating choices.

What area of dietetics do you work in? 

A bit of a mix really. Mostly pediatrics, with a side of oncology.

How would you explain what you do? 

I help support parents with feeding their little ones, and work to reduce anxieties and frustrations that come with that. My goal is to help parents build a positive feeding relationship, and to avoid and manage picky eating. I can relate to so many of the struggles my clients have as a mom of two little ones myself.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks? 

I’m on social media more than I would like to be, but this seems to be a key part of my work as a private practice dietitian. I write Facebook and blog posts, do live videos, and prepare for upcoming workshops both online and in-person. My practice is shifting to one that offers more support online and by phone, so I’m often on calls with parents throughout the day. And when I’m not doing that, I’m chasing my toddler and preschooler around as I’m home part-time with them.

What has been your career path? 

I started in addictions, as a clinical dietitian at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. After my mat leave, I decided to switch gears and create my own job in an area I’ve become very passionate about, pediatrics. I’m still working in my private practice in this area. As someone who has always liked to try new things, I’ve recently started working casually as a clinical dietitian with the BC Cancer Agency, which has proved to be incredibly interesting and meaningful work.

What advanced education or special training do you have? 

I completed a Master of Public Health in Community Nutrition from the University of Toronto. I also speak Spanish fluently (does that count?).

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now? 

I wish there was a better understanding from the public and other health professionals about what RDs actually do and what we have to offer. And I’d love to see more collaboration between RDs. I often sense that RDs feel like they’re in competition with one another, instead of joining forces to create something bigger and better.

What would you like people to know about RDs? 

I would love for people to know that dietitians all have their own lenses and biases. I think this is true for all professions, but for some reason I find dietitians tend to get painted with the same brush. I think this is what makes us great. We each have something unique to offer, and what fits for one client may not work for another.

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals? 

Being a great dietitian is definitely a craft. I think what sets us apart from other wellness professionals is that we have the knowledge base and skills to take evidence-based information and translate it in a way that is practical and useful.

What is your favourite meal? 

Sushi. So cliche as a west coaster, but I seriously think I could eat it just about every day.

What tip(s) would you give to our readers? 

I remember something an experienced dietitian (Carol Dombrow) once said during my practicum that stuck with me. Her advice was to stay open to all areas of nutrition and opportunities that arose and never close the door on anything. This has kind of been my motto ever since I finished school. Sometimes you think your path will lead you a certain way, but it doesn’t. It might lead you somewhere even better.

More about Caitlin:


Website: Wee Nourish
Facebook: Wee Nourish Nutrition
Email: caitlin@weenourish.ca









Thanks Caitlin! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

What RDs Do: Vanessa Yurchesyn, RD, CFE, MBA (candidate)

VANESSA YURCHESYN
ACCOUNT MANAGER
COMPLETE PURCHASING SERVICES INC
for something nutrishus 


Vanessa was excited about the opportunity to share her non-traditional role, especially since she loves the work that she does. Her passion also fits very well with the purpose of this series. She is 1 of 3 dietitians on Complete Purchasing Services's national account management team with the President Brian Emmerton and one of the VPs, Cristina Dee-Ong.

Why did you become a RD?

First and foremost, I love food! I job shadowed dietitians in a few practice areas in high school, and the diversity of the profession was something that I was attracted to – I knew that I would always be inspired to try something new!

What area of dietetics do you work in?

Business & Industry

How would you explain what you do?

I am an Account Manager with Complete Purchasing Services (a Group Purchasing Organization and a division of Aramark). I am responsible for servicing and developing the Complete Purchasing Services primary market (mainly senior living facilities) in Nova Scotia. We provide best value pricing on products and services utilizing the combined purchasing power of Aramark and our client locations.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

I manage our Nova Scotia account base, which is mainly senior living facilities but also includes schools, child care centres, social enterprises and camps. I work closely with our distributor, manufacturer and supplier partners in the industry to assist our clients in maximizing the overall benefits derived from a CPS membership. In an ever-evolving business environment, I must keep up-to-date with client and industry issues and requirements. We offer a number of core operational tools and resources from menu programs to ordering platforms and educational events, so I promote these value-added services to our members. I am also responsible for growing our business, which is fun and motivates me every day!

What has been your career path?

When I completed my internship in 2011, I took a 1 year contract with Shannex as Manager of Support Services (Foodservices, Housekeeping and Laundry) at a long term care facility in Halifax, NS. I then worked part time as a clinical dietitian at two long term care facilities in Saint John, NB while starting a consulting business ‘All Foods Fit Nutrition Consulting’ where I did workplace wellness programs, individual consultations and media work. In May of 2014, I started with Loblaw Companies Ltd as a retail dietitian and worked for 2.5 years providing nutrition services to five Atlantic Superstore locations in New Brunswick. This brings me to my current role as Account Manager with Complete Purchasing Services. January 2018 will mark five years of being a Registered Dietitian!

What advanced education or special training do you have?

I am currently completing a Master of Business Administration (MBA) with a specialty track in Innovation Leadership at the University of Fredericton Sandermoen School of Business. I will graduate in the Spring of 2019.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

Consumers don’t worry about the food that they eat, food is increasingly treated as medicine by everyone including food companies, and dietitians are known to all as food lovers not food police.

What are you passionate about in dietetics?

I am passionate about celebrating the diversity within the dietetics profession. I love sharing my non-traditional career path with students and interns, as well as seasoned dietitians. I enjoy experimenting with and learning about how a dietitian’s skill set can put them in positions that were never imagined.

What is your favourite meal?

Of course, the answer depends on the season! In the Spring/Summer, I love fish tacos with grilled fish, a mango/cucumber salsa and red cabbage slaw. In the Fall/Winter, I enjoy a hearty beef stew over creamy mashed potatoes. Crème brulee or anything with chocolate are my favorites desserts.

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

Life is too short – we should be able to enjoy what we eat and drink. With that said, practicing mindfulness and being active every day are just as important!

More about Vanessa:


Email: yurchesyn-vanessa@aramark.ca
Instagram: @allfoodsfitrd
Facebook: Vanessa Yurchesyn
Complete Purchasing Services: www.ecps.ca







Thanks Vanessa! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

What RDs Do: Jorie Janzen RD, IOC Dipl Sports Nutr, CSSD, CCF

JORIE JANZEN
DIRECTOR OF SPORT DIETETICS
for something nutrishus


I know and have met Jorie in person (she is a human after all!). I filled a maternity leave and consult for the Canadian Sport Centre Saskatchewan, the province next to hers. She wasn't there when I played, but I would have worked with her in Winnipeg with the Canadian Women's Indoor Volleyball Team as well. Jorie has been working and mentoring in the field for almost 15 years in the areas of nutrition for sport performance, disordered eating and eating disorders, and in corporate health and wellness. This interview is just another way for her to give back and support others.

Why did you become a RD?

Because I needed to pick something to go into! LOL! Seriously. I was in second year just taking courses. I started to freak out because I did not know what I was going to do with my life. I decided to use the University counselling services and dietetics came up. I had no idea what this involved, so took a couple of courses and thought, what the heck! I have to go into something. Nutrition seemed pretty cool…but I still had no idea what a dietitian did until internship.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

I currently work in sports dietetics as my full time area of practice as Director of Sport Dietetics at the Canadian Sport Centre-Manitoba. I also have a small private practice that includes workplace wellness and ED/DE (eating disorders/disordered eating) in athletes.

How would you explain what you do?

What do I do….always a question I ask myself! I think what I do is coach those willing to work with me in resolving a conflict they are having with themselves and food. Really, we as dietitians are conflict resolution specialists in our areas of expertise!

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

As with many dietitians, what is typical is that there is no typical. If I have to somewhat narrow down typical tasks it would be connecting with my ISTs (interdisciplinary support teams) around the athletes we work with to ensure we are all doing what is needed to support athletes, coaches and at times parents/significant others. Sometimes there are the mechanical things to do such as nutrient analysis, developing and modifying meal plans, grocery store tours, cooking classes, hydration testing, body composition testing, connecting with my colleagues across the country, presenting to teachers, coaches, parents…and I do a ton of mentoring! I am a huge believer that there is room for all of us and if we build each other up we will all be stronger practitioners/service providers because of it.

What has been your career path? What advanced education or special training do you have?

I went to the University of Manitoba and got my BHEc (major Nutrition) and completed Health Sciences Centre Dietetic Internship program. I did not start out full time in sport. Out of internship I started working at two long-term care facilities and eventually moved to a larger facility. Then, an amazing opportunity came up with the WRHA Surgery Prehabilitation Program where I worked with an amazing team of professionals getting patients healthy for hip/knee replacement surgery. All the while I kept a private practice on the side taking on team sport nutrition presentations for provincial teams, Canada Games preperations, coach workshops as well as co-chairing the DC SNN, sitting on the executive board for Sport Medicine and Science Council Manitoba and started the Manitoba Sport Nutrition Network.

I then completed the IOC Diploma in Sports Nutrition. Next up, my current position as Director of Sports Dietetics with the Canadian Sport Centre-Manitoba. As well I have added the CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics) credential. I also did the ISAK Level 1 certification, but do need to take the course again to renew. I also attended several leadership workshops as well as one of my favourites for working with and dealing with clients; Molley Kellogg’s Intensive Motivational Interviewing course and became a Life Coach through the Certified Coaches Federation certification.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

Wow. This is such a massive and possibly loaded question and I could likely fill pages upon pages around this one question. Working in sport I have experienced great joys and achievements and great sadness and failures. I will try to keep this to the point and positive with my hopes. In an ideal world, I would hope that the area of sports nutrition is seen as vital as any other area RDs practice. I hope that dietetic programs and internship programs start to value and provide higher-level education and practicum opportunities. Right now there is ONE course in the faculty devoted to sports nutrition at the University of Manitoba. I only get 2 interns a year for 3-weeks to mentor! And the reason is that interns need to gain experience in clinical or out patient or rural areas. Guess what?! A sports dietitian can easily provide such opportunities! Dietitians who work in sport deal with rehabilitation (concussion, surgery, other injuries), eating disorders and disordered eating, food intolerances and allergies, hematological issues, dietary restrictions or changes and so much more!

In five years I hope that the dietetic education programs has a greater respect for this area of practice. In five years I hope that sport medicine clinics, college and university sport programs and other organizations working with athletes see the value of having a sports dietitian as part of the full time staff/program.

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up?

In the area of sports nutrition, I would like to clear up that we do not work with only healthy and motivated people. We work with human beings who happen to be athletes, dancers, or performers. These are human beings who are often very high achievers and need support from us. They fall prey to the same misinformation as the rest of the world because…they are human.

What would you like people to know about RDs?

Working in sport or working in research or in a clinical setting, we do amazing work every single day! We counsel, motivate, inspire and even save lives! We clear up myths vs. facts. We are also very human….my most favorite part!

What do people think that you do for a living?

I tell people what to eat. Others seem to think I can provide medical advice or diagnose ailments. The latter makes me laugh!

What are you passionate about in dietetics?

I am extremely passionate about clearing up false information and normalizing food. I love making fun of what people think we do! Gotta have fun with it!

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals? 

Well, for one, we are regulated and accountable to a regulatory body. So, we have to be evidence based. And, generally, RDs are not all about the black and white way of eating. Every time I give a talk or meet with a client they feel relieved to not be judged.

What is your favourite meal? 

I love Thai and Indian food. But I always look forward to dessert.

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

No matter what area you choose to practice in, always surround yourself with other professionals who can support you and you support them – not just other RDs but other professionals. I have found that when you give, there will always be others waiting to give back.

Anything else you’d like to add that you feel would be valuable:

Even though I do strongly feel that there is much growth to be done in sports nutrition practice in Canada…I always try to make the grass greener on my side! Life is more enjoyable that way!

More about Jorie:

Website: Jorie Janzen
Website: Canadian Sport Centre Manitoba
Twitter: @jjjanzen
Instagram: @joriejanzen


Thanks Jorie! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

What RDs Do: What RDs Do: Judith Scharman Draughon, MS, RDN, LD

JUDITH SCHARMAN DRAUGHON
FOODS WITH JUDES &
LEAN BODY, SMART LIFE
for something nutrishus


It's always great to meet dietitians via other dietitians. Judith (AKA Judes) was referred by interviewee Krista Ulatowski. She's a client of Krista's and went from supermarket RDN to corporate wellness RDN to now author RDN. Her career hasn't followed a straight line, but her experiences have helped her create a unique position and business.

Why did you become a RD? 

I was always interested in nutrition from my junior high track days through high school days as I learned to balance my eating habits. 

What area of dietetics do you work in? 

Wellness

How would you explain what you do? 

I help people sort through the massive amounts of nutrition information to know what to eat that fits into their lifestyle. 

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks? 

I motivate groups of people to make healthier choices through presentations and seminars. I also create recipes or find products that are healthy, easy, fast and delicious! 

What has been your career path? 

My first job was a clinical dietitian at a hospital. Then I became an outpatient dietitian for a hospital. After my first child was born, I wrote a book about healthy food shopping and launched a supermarket tour business that I led for a few years until I moved to the Middle East for four years. I was fortunate in that I had the opportunity to travel extensively throughout the world while raising my children. 

Upon returning to the States, I worked with parents to create a health-promoting environment for their children and teens. I even hold a patent for a children’s nutrition educational tool! During this time, I also taught nutrition and healthy cooking at a culinary institute. In 2013, I continued teaching at the culinary institute but started a private practice with an emphasis on corporate wellness. I helped employees to live healthier lives in a group setting through presentations and seminars. I also worked with CEOs of companies to improve their health despite their hectic traveling schedules. That was a good fit for me given I led a busy life filled with travel, too. 

In an attempt to help these employees and clients, I narrowed down the scientific findings to the twelve most important things, or “fixes,” they could make to improve their weight and health. These twelve “fixes” became the base of my new book, “Lean Body Smart Life: 12-Fix Plan to a Leaner, Healthier, Happier Life.” The book is chock-full of tangible ways to actually apply these 12 fixes to people’s busy lives. It includes shopping advice, cooking formulas and 36 educational videos. It will soon have an accompanying app to help track the fixes you are working on. I also have a Lean Body, Smart Life RDN Affiliate Program, so dietitians can use my book and presentations to open up doors to help more groups, organization and clients.

Since becoming an author, I primarily speak to groups across the country and spread my message of ways to make small changes that make a big impact on your health over time. I love helping people feel better!


What advanced education or special training do you have? 

I have a bachelor of science degree in medical dietetics and a masters of science in health education. I regularly attend conferences where the leading researchers are presenting from around the world. I also have an advanced certificate of training in adult weight management and another in pediatric weight management from the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. 

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now? 

A world with less nutrition misinformation and more sound nutritional information based on science being dispensed. 

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up? 

RDs are the nutrition experts!

What are challenges you encounter as a RD? 

RDs have degrees that are based on biochemistry so our ability to look at the whole health picture is more clear than those with less science education. Consequently, when those with less science-based education provide counseling, there is a lot of mistruth that is being applied to peoples’ diets that is counterproductive to long-term health. 

What do people think that you do for a living? 

Many people think I’m a cook. 

What are you passionate about in dietetics? 

Helping people know what to eat to make them feel better for years to come. 

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals? 

Often RDs have more science-based education along with a broader scope of nutrition to fit scientific truth into the whole picture. 

What is your favourite meal? 

Grilled seafood and roasted vegetables or grilled seafood on a green salad. 

What tip(s) would you give to our readers? 

Connect with the groups, patients and clients you work with before you try to help them. Often it takes just a minute or two. By this I mean listen to what they need and where they are at in their lives. Then meet them there rather than deciding what they should do. 

More about Judith:

Website: Foods With Judes
Instagram: @foodswithjudes
Facebook: Foods With Judes
Twitter: @FoodsWithJudes
Pinterest: Foods With Judes
Google+: Foods With Judes




Thanks Judes! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

What RDs Do: Nancy Clark MS, RD, CSSD

NANCY CLARK
SPORTS NUTRITIONIST & AUTHOR
for something nutrishus


Like others, Nancy is a dietitian I have looked up to throughout my career; I feel honoured to include her in this series. She's a trailblazer in sport nutrition, that's for sure, and I'm sure she has seen a lot of positive changes throughout her career, although there are still many opportunities for sports dietitians to explore.

Why did you become a RD?

Having an interest in cooking and food, I chose to attend a college that offered a nutrition degree. At the time I graduated from college, “everyone” did an internship and then took the exam to become an RD. I followed the crowd, and became an RD so I would be qualified to help people learn more about nutrition. Becoming a sports dietitian was not even on my radar screen. In 1973, very few people were talking about how to fuel to win.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

As a sports dietitian, my niche is nutrition for sports and exercise. 

How would you explain what you do?

I work with a variety of sports-active people of all ages and athletic abilities, helping them win with good nutrition. A typical week might include teaching:
  • a marathoner how to fuel well and set a personal record. 
  • a wrestler to make weight healthfully.
  • a triathlete to have enough energy to complete an Ironman. 
  • a compulsive exerciser to transform exhaustive exercise into effective training that includes rest days and proper fueling. 
  • an eating disordered high school athlete to find peace with food. 

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

I counsel individual clients on three days a week. I generally present a workshop once a week to a club, team, or professional group; write a blog and/or an article, answer lots of emails, and work on projects. Never a dull moment!

What has been your career path?

I majored in Nutrition at Simmons College in Boston, completed my dietetic internship at Massachusetts General Hospital, worked for 5 years in clinical dietetics and nutrition education, and then went back to graduate school at Boston University, where I earned my masters in Nutrition with a focus on Exercise Physiology. My first job as a sports dietitian was at a sports medicine clinic, where I established myself as one of the nation’s first RDs to create a viable sports nutrition career. Part of my success was due to having written the best-selling Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook, as well as being a co-leader of a sports nutrition workshop series offered nationwide to groups of health professions. I co-led the workshop with an exercise physiologist. Currently, this workshop is available online. Today, I now enjoy my successful private practice in the Boston-area, as well as sell my handouts and PowerPoint presentations to help other RDs who want to get more involved in this niche.

What advanced education or special training do you have?

In addition to my master’s degree, I have taken an exam that qualifies me as a board certified specialist in sports dietetics (CSSD).

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

Five years from now, sports dietitians will be consultants or employees of most professional sports teams, including baseball, basketball, hockey and football. Sports RDs will also work with athletes coming up through the ranks, starting in high schools, then colleges and sub-elite and recreational sports teams. This is a good time to become a sports dietitian!

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

If you want more information on how to become a sports dietitian, spend time at www.SCANdpg.org. SCAN is the Sports and Cardiovascular Nutrition Dietary Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

More about Nancy:

Website: www.NancyClarkRD.com
Workshop: Nutrition Sports Exercise CEUs
Twitter: @nclarkrd




Thanks Nancy! Find out more about What RDs Do.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!