Tuesday, July 18, 2017

What RDs Do: Jim Seeger, M. Ed., RDN, LDN, ATC

JIM SEEGER
SPORTS RD
for something nutrishus

 

Jim correctly pointed out the lack of men in this series, so I challenged him to take part! He also inspired me to reach out, and as you can see there is more male representation now. A love of food and a passion for working with people led Jim to dietetics. He has a unique set of skills and credentials which impact the nutrition education he provides. 

Why did you become a RD?

I went to the Culinary Institute of America, in Hyde Park '93 and was cooking professionally. I worked as a chef and wanted to help provide food that was nutritious and "tasted good"! In the past food that was "healthy" always not very palatable. In addition, getting back to where food actually comes from was vital for health and nutrition.

What area of dietetics do you work in?


I currently work in the area of athletics, providing food and nutrition expertise to athletes and physically active individuals either in the athletic training room or when I teach cooking to surgical residents.

How would you explain what you do?

I take care of physically active individuals as an ATC (certified athletic trainer) and as an RD. I use my cooking knowledge to help educated individuals on what food is, healthy food and how it can impact their performance. As one of my mentors said, "nutrition is never neutral."

What are your typical daily/weekly tasks?

I interact daily with high school athletes in the training room. I prepare the athletes for practice and games. This begins with my assessment, testing and making recommendation for rehabbing their injuries. I am part of the sports medicine team helping the athletes prepare for their work to improve.

What has been your career path?
I don't have the typical career path but have combined a series of professions that work well together. All this really starts with my love of food. There is "no good or bad food" just how we use it. I have obtained certifications and licensure so I can practice and help the populations I have worked with.


What advanced education or special training do you have?

I earned a Masters in Education, then worked in professional sports in the marketing and sales side of athletics. I decided that dealing with people was my true passion and earned my RD and then ATC (certified athletic trainer) while having licensure in both disciplines.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like in 5 years from now?

Well, I don't live in Utopia, but we as the food and nutrition experts will still be fighting the misinformation about nutrition and trying to fight the "magic bullet" when hard work and eating food still is the key.

More about Jim:

Twitter: @JSeegerRDATC



Thanks Jim! Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

What RDs Do: Dallas Odgers, RD, CF-L2

DALLAS ODGERS
COMMUNITY - OUTPATIENT & LTC,
GYM OWNER/PRIVATE PRACTICE
for something nutrishus


As a fairly new business owner, we will have to keep our eyes on Dallas as I'm sure he'll do amazing things as he gets more into private practice. It seems that he has 'entrepreneur' written all over him. His is another story of a day job and a night job due to passion related to the field of dietetics and helping people with lifestyle changes. I love seeing the passion in our profession and it seems that Dallas has also come across that.

Why did you become a RD?

I grew up thinking Kraft Dinner and Pizza Pops weren’t THAT bad for you. Even though playing sports every day, my body did not reflect how athletic I was. After my first year of cross country and long-distance running, I was able to see the importance of modifying your diet to improve your performance. After having a really successful season (in comparison to the first year), I was hooked on my new healthy lifestyle. I kept the days of pizza pops and mars bars in the past. Later in high school I developed an interest in health care as a potential career choice because I thought it was something that could favour a guy who geeked out on science. I then found out about nutrition/dietetics and thought it was the perfect fit for me, but I was nervous about getting into a program that accepts less than 30 people.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

My ‘daily-grind’ is working as a community dietitian in the rural area around Maidstone, SK. I do mostly Outpatient and long term care (LTC) work in a bunch of communities around North Battleford/Maidstone.

My ‘night-hustle’ is working as a gym owner/private practice dietitian. Two years ago I opened up North Battleford Strength & Conditioning/CrossFit North Battleford, which gives me a great platform to work with people as a dietitian. With a large focus on developing our space, and fitness programs, I am ready to start working a lot more on private practice dietetic work and I am super excited about it.

How would you explain what you do?

I usually try to focus on describing the type of people I help and the value that I can bring them. For example, a common description would be that I help people manage their diabetes through education, goal setting, and accountability—this would be the majority of my clientele.

As my business grows, it will more likely be something like this: I am a private practice dietitian that offers strength and conditioning coaching, community, and nutrition education for long-term lifestyle change.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

It’s crazy.

Hit the road at 6:30-6:45 AM to Maidstone SK, where I could then be traveling to Cut Knife, Turtleford, St. Walburg, Neilburg, Thunderchild, or Edam. I usually see 5-6 clients per day, typically a joint appointment with a Diabetes Nurse Educator. From there I could have a LTC client, on a referral basis. Weekly I will often have meetings with the Health Region dietitian team and often provide education sessions to staff in facilities.

At about 4:30 PM I hit the road again and arrive at my other job at 5:15 PM. Here I will jump in on a class and then coach 1-2 classes an evening. I will book nutrition clients as they come up and touch base frequently through email, phone, or briefly after training sessions. I also do a lot of non-dietitian work on the business end to keep everything running as smoothly as possible.

What has been your career path?

After internship I started working in an Outpatient and LTC maternity leave, where I started my first (unsuccessful) business. I started an organization called Wild Youth Sports Management that hired collegiate level athletes to coordinate sport camps/activities with youth throughout Saskatchewan. Our first summer had me employing over 15 Huskie Athletes and providing sports training for over 2000 kids in Saskatchewan.

I realized I wanted to open a training facility as I had become passionate about Olympic weightlifting and CrossFit in University. When I moved back home I had nowhere to train. I had worked for a couple years in conventional and CrossFit gyms, so thought I would give running a CrossFit affiliate a shot and it has gained traction quickly in North Battleford. Just a year ago having about 20 members has grown into a program with over 120 participants currently.

While opening the gym I also completed a pilot project to incorporate a Primary Care Dietitian into the Prairie North Health region, which now provides dietitian services in 3 medical clinics in the Battlefords Area. Now I hold a full-time community dietitian position, as mentioned before.

What advanced education or special training do you have?


In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

Ideally, in my mind, health care overall would start placing more focus/energy and funds towards prevention rather than treatment, by having better access to exercise programs, diet education, and mental health support. I feel like the dietetics industry will start to see more and more private practice dietitians that are developing niches and specialties. I hope that this will continue to build awareness that dietitians have a huge and powerful influence to help people achieve their goals.

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up?

That we only provide education on using Canada’s Food Guide (CFG). I have had doctors assume that I would just be giving out CFGs when I started to work in their office—something they apparently did not stand for. I don’t have an extreme hate towards CFG, and it does ultimately incorporate balance that the majority of people trying to improve their diets should work on, but it’s not a tool I regularly use in practice.

What would you like people to know about RDs?

They are relentlessly hard workers. I have met so many RDs with extreme work ethic. I have seen them shutting down the library as nutrition students. Now I see them addicted to learning and finding new online courses, books, and journals when they get into practice. I see them constantly networking and communicating amongst other dietitians and health care professionals. I have seen so many RDs become addicted to the process of working on becoming the best dietitian they can be.

What are challenges you encounter as a RD?

I find, with most of my clients I may identify a ton of things they could work on, but more than 1-2 actionable items are usually going to overwhelm them. I read a book once, The Compound Effect, which lays out a pretty simple formula: small/simple changes + consistency + time = success in achieving your goals. This is a good approach, where we choose 1-2 actionable items so that they can experience success and want to actually continue to work with me rather than avoid me because I laid out a plan that was very unrealistic for them.

What are you passionate about in dietetics?

Lifestyle change. I get just as excited about watching someone do their first pull-up or hitting a PR on their back squat as I do when someone drops their A1C to target from diet changes with my advice. I think that is one thing that keeps me going for my 12-15 hour work days is that I get to continuously see people make positive lifestyle changes that I have some small part in!

What is your favourite meal?

Greek chicken BBQ’d on a small charcoal grill, couscous, and veggies served with an questionable amount of Tzatziki on top.

More about Dallas:

Instagram: @crossfitnb
Website: North Battleford Strength & Conditioning/CrossFit North Battleford



Thanks Dallas! Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!





Tuesday, July 4, 2017

What RDs Do: Steph Langdon, RD

STEPH LANGDON
SOMETHING NUTRISHUS & WHAT RDS DO
hosted by Brooke Bulloch


What RDs Do Interview Series – TAKEOVER!

Hey, hey! It’s Brooke Bulloch here from Food to Fit in Saskatoon! I had the pleasure of being highlighted as part of the What RDs Do Interview Series back in October 2015. Today I’m taking over Stephanie Langdon’s What RDs Do!

With Stephanie celebrating 7 years in business this week AND her 100th What RDs Do interview coming up in August, I thought it was an opportune time to take over and interview the very creator of the What RDs Do Interview Series!

Stephanie is a fellow Saskatoon-based Dietitian and entrepreneur who is doing incredible work for the profession. As founder of the What RDs Do blog and as part of Dietitians of Canada's Brand Ambassador team, Stephanie’s efforts to educate the public and promote the invaluable and diverse work of Dietitians is admirable. As someone who inspires me, I wanted to give the spotlight to her today!

Thank you, Stephanie, for all you do and for this incredible blog series. Happy 7-year anniversary!


Why did you become a RD?

I was pursuing a science degree, perhaps headed towards Physiology, but unsure what I’d do with it. I took an introductory nutrition course and loved the practicality of what I learned, so I decided to apply to the College of Nutrition. I was an athlete at the time, so I saw the obvious connections to performance and thought sport nutrition might be an end goal for me.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

Private practice: consulting and communications

How would you explain what you do?

I try to balance being a mom with running my business (a work-at-home-mom). I work with many agriculture/commodity/industry groups helping with presentations, resource development, event attendance, media, social media and strategy. Like most dietitians I do many things. I curate/run this blog series, I do a bit of work for our Sport Medicine and Science Council of Saskatchewan, for our local Canadian Forces, and freelance projects. I am also on Dietitians of Canada’s Brand Leadership Team as the SK/MB (Saskatchewan/Manitoba) Team Captain.


What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

My day/week might consist of:
  • sport nutrition presentations for active 13-18 year olds
  • formatting blog posts
  • reading journals, books, websites, and media to stay up on research and trends
  • creating social media content
  • responding to emails
  • seeing the occasional one-on-one client
  • I am also sometimes working at events, creating content/resources, sitting in on meetings or listening to webinars

What has been your career path?

I have worked in private practice since I finished my internship. I initially planned to work in sport nutrition, and in Canada that was the path that made sense – self-employment. Prior to that I was an elite athlete (Team Canada and pro volleyball) and worked at Lululemon while finishing up my degree. Since then it has just been the evolution of my practice as different things have interested me, I’ve learned to say NO to things I’m not passionate about or weren’t a good fit, and I became a mom.

What advanced education or special training do you have?

I have my BSc. Nutrition as well as various certifications/courses/conferences/webinars etc. that I constantly take part in as continued learning in the various areas I work in (Craving Change, Motivational Interviewing, sport nutrition, agriculture, social media, etc.)

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

As someone who advocates for the profession, I hope that people come to know what dietitians do (which is varied) and who dietitians are, as well as the difference from nutritionists. I hope that health insurance plans cover dietitian services so that they’re more accessible. I am also intrigued by how the environment shapes our behaviours so I hope to see health promoting spaces and places so that healthy choices can be the default choices. With the strong influence of social media I also hope we move away from unrealistic ‘ideals’, can live authentically off-line and stop judging/shaming others, as there are many ways to be healthy.

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up?

We don’t just make meal plans and take away your favourite food(s).

What would you like people to know about RDs?

We work in a variety of settings, not just in hospitals and we’re here to help with various nutrition/eating/food topics, whether that’s dealing with a chronic illness, a picky eater, preventative health care, policy creation, brand messaging, recipe development, or helping sort through all the misinformation out there. The list goes on and on (as you’ve seen in this series!).

What are challenges you encounter as a RD?

The ‘personal opinion/celebrity’ type information that can mislead people and perhaps even be dangerous. It’s great that people are talking about nutrition, but there are so many promises of quick fixes and an obesogenic environment that we have our work cut out for us in years ahead.

What do people think that you do for a living?

I’m not sure, as it’s hard to articulate what I do. I think it took a few years before people realized this wasn’t my hobby, but my job, and was paying the bills.

What are you passionate about in dietetics?

Habits and prevention. We live in the moment and think about immediate enjoyment, not always the long-term consequences, we also have ingrained ways of doing things. I’d like to help people create healthy habits and be able to make informed decisions about food – whether that is choosing to have the ice cream or blueberries, there’s room for it all and there isn’t a single ‘correct’ way to be or eat healthy.

More about Steph:

Facebook: Steph Langdon, RD
Twitter: @nutrishusRD
Instagram: @langdonsteph
LinkedIn: Stephanie (Wheler) Langdon, BSc. RD
Pinterest: @NutrishusRD


Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

What RDs Do: Jullian MacLean, RD (& soon to be MHA)

JULLIAN MACLEAN
COMMUNITY DIETETICS
for something nutrishus



I know men have been under-represented in the series so far. I don't know stats or numbers, but dietetics does seem to be female dominant. When I was in university we had 2 of 23 students that were male in our program. I did receive recommendations and I hope you'll be seeing more like this to get a more well-rounded glimpse at our field. Feel free to comment or refer if you think there's another area the series has missed (I'm also trying to get it more international...). 

Jullian works in a unique geographical location that has it's own nutritional challenges (which fortunately he is passionate about) and is a part of Canada I have yet to visit. Once again we see the wide range of tasks that dietitians are involved in, even within a single week. He's currently working towards a Master's degree and expresses his thoughts on further education below.

Why did you become a RD?

First I decided I wanted to do a Science Degree with a major in Nutrition. Then in my third year of my science degree, I decided I wanted to be an RD because I wanted to be part of a regulated, standardized network. In particular, I wanted prospective employers to have confidence that I was competent in Nutritional Science and becoming an RD was an excellent way to achieve that.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

I would describe my work as community dietetics.

How would you explain what you do?

My core responsibilities are nutrition promotion, diabetes management and prevention, food security improvement and research facilitation of six remote Inuvialuit communities near and along the coast of the Arctic Ocean in the Northwest Territories.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

A typical week would include the following tasks:
  • Reviewing and discussing reports from five different community support workers on the progress of community-level cooking circles. 
  • Assessing five Inuvialuit Childcare Centre's nutrition and food related needs and planning menu cycles accordingly. 
  • Planning regional diabetes workshops including working closely with the regional health authority to ensure interdisciplinary representation. In others, making sure other health professionals (such as foot care nurses, physiotherapists and pharmacists) are available to speak to workshop participants about their diabetes. 
  • Planning food security research with external researchers including innovative ways to improve the high prevalence of food insecurity in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. 
  • Planning TrainCan.Inc Food Safe level 1 and 2 certification courses. 
  • Other nutritional related tasks as they come up. 

What has been your career path?


Pretty short. I did an integrated dietetic internship. One time, in between internships, I worked as a student for four months at Inuvik Regional Hospital in the Northwest Territories. Afterwards, I went straight into an internship at Inuvik Regional Hospital and then followed that with an internship with Yellowknife Public Health in the Northwest Territories. Eleven months later a full-time job came up in Inuvik, I applied and I was successful. I have been doing that job ever since.

What advanced education or special training do you have?
  • I am a certified TrainCan.Inc Food Safe Level 1 and 2 trainer and certifier. It is a nationally recognized certificate in Canada (with a few possible exceptions depending on local provincial and territorial regulations). 
  • I will officially have a Masters in Health Administration as of November 2017 when I graduate. 

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?


I’d like to see RDs become a Master-level degree program (similar to many other health professions today) with extra courses in interdisciplinary practice and how health systems in Canada are organized along with the usual internship process.

What would you like people to know about RDs?


I’m not looking in your grocery cart!

What are challenges you encounter as a RD?


RDs provide evidence-based recommendations for food which is a multi-billion-dollar industry with some pretty loose marketing regulations. It’s a classic David versus Goliath scenario.

What do people think that you do for a living?

I get the impression people think I am some kind of ultra-enforcer who demands people only eat fruits and vegetables and never dessert. Other times people have me confused with a chef. I am neither.

What are you passionate about in dietetics?


Food security advocacy is my favourite topic. Canada has very interesting polices when it comes to feeding the nation and, when you look at the evidence, the real changes that need to occur in this country to improve food security are at the policy level. Plus, I live and work in Canada’s Arctic where people here have a different perspective on what food security means compared to the rest of Canada. It just adds another layer that is really fascinating.

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals?


I would say RDs are the most conservative when it comes to nutrition/wellness recommendations compared to other nutrition/wellness professionals. That is what I respect most about the profession. It emphasizes the need to provide recommendations only when evidence is available for such recommendations.

What is your favourite meal?


Loaded nachos with olives, jalapeños, tomatoes, green peppers, tex-mex cheese, green onions and chili on-top (yes, chili!)

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

Thinking “outside-the-box” is “inside-the-box” thinking. Think about it.

More about Jullian:

Email: jullian.maclean@gmail.com
LinkedIn: Jullian MacLean


Thanks Jullian! Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

What RDs Do: Leslie Bonci, MPH, RDN, CSSD, LDN

LESLIE BONCI
ACTIVE EATING ADVICE BY LESLIE
for something nutrishus


I took a stab in the dark and reached out to Leslie on twitter to see if she'd be interested in taking part in the series, she graciously accepted and I am pleased to share her responses below. I've worked in sport nutrition throughout my private practice years, so to me, Leslie Bonci is a household name and I'm honoured to share her experience and expertise, as well as her infectious personality!

Why did you become a RD?

I majored in biopsychology as an undergraduate, wasn’t sure what I wanted to do with that degree but in graduate school my first class was a maternal and child nutrition course and I knew right away. I wanted to impact an individual’s health through their mind and plate.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

I started in Cardiac and Pulmonary rehab, went on to general outpatient nutrition, and then specialized in sports nutrition, digestive disorders, eating disorders and weight management.

How would you explain what you do?

On any given day, I can be one-on-one with clients, doing media work, recipe development, teaching a class, or writing. I never have cookie cutter days which makes me very happy.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

I never have typical days, but weekly I do both radio and TV, weekly I see clients on an individual basis, weekly I devote time to writing (working on 2 manuscripts), weekly I work on recipe development/ideas for pitches, and blogs on behalf of industry clients.

What has been your career path?

Untraditional.

Undergrad degree in Biopsychology from Vassar college- graduated in 3 years, went to graduate school at the University of Pittsburgh graduate school of public health and obtained in a 3 year period a MPH (Master of Public Health) in Nutritional Epidemiology, took the undergrad nutrition courses and grad nutrition courses to fulfill the requirements for a dietetic internship, did the dietetic internship and also worked on a research study funded by the National Cancer Institute.

My first job as a RD was at a Cardiac and Wellness Center in Wheeling, WV where I had the opportunity to work with exercise physiologists and develop wellness programs. Moving back to Pittsburgh, I contacted the University of Pittsburgh department of athletics and they said yes to having me work with their athletes. I worked with Pitt athletics for 29 years. I also worked for the Pittsburgh Steelers (24 years), The Cleveland Browns (3 years), The Pittsburgh Pirates (15 years), Toronto Blue Jays (15 years), Washington Nationals (3 years), Milwaukee Brewers (3 years), Pittsburgh Penguins (5 years) and still work with the Kansas City Chiefs (going on my 3rd year). I also consult to the Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, the WNBA and Olympic athletes.

I was also a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for 8 years and still do quite a bit of media: TV, radio, print, online and videos.

I have authored 2 books and co-authored 4 books.

What advanced education or special training do you have?

I have the CSSD credential- board certified specialist in sports dietetics.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

Many more private practitioners delivering our counseling via cyberspace. Nutrigenomics will play more of a role so we can customize our recommendations as precisely as possible. There will be more nutrition “experts” in our space so we have to find the way to stand out, debunk the junk and safeguard our clients.

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up?

We are not the watchdogs, we want to be eating enablers, not disablers. We are food and nutrition professionals. We eat and we want our clients/patients to enjoy food without guilt, fear or angst.

What would you like people to know about RDs?

We have fun, we are fearless, we are proactive not reactive and we can have an impact. We are the Real Deal!

What are challenges you encounter as a RD?

Trying to debunk the misinformation when my clients get their nutrition info from those that do NOT know. Trying to position science as sciensensational, and combat the scienciness that non RDs tend to preach.

What do people think that you do for a living?

I am often referred to as the nutrition lady, kind of like the Avon lady going door-to-door selling nutrition. Actually a door-to-door food truck would really be meals on wheels and give people the opportunity to taste and learn simultaneously!

What are you passionate about in dietetics?

The ability to compel and impel as well as dispel the misinformation. The excitement of taking the science and communicating in easily digestible bites while cultivating consumers’ interest in taking care of themselves for the long run. I am always thrilled when an eating disorder patient is actually able to eat without fear, or the Crohn’s patient eats without pain, or the athlete notices positive impacts on performance as a result of tweaks to timing, quantity or quality of his/her eating plan.

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals?


We bring the food and nutrition expertise, the clinical background, the counseling background, the understanding of the importance and role of cultural diversity on food choices as well as knowledge of nutrition needs throughout the lifecycle.

In addition our background in food service and food science enables us to put the nutrition into the kitchen!

What is your favourite meal?

Seafood bouillabaisse, crusty Sourdough bread and a wonderful Pinot Noir.

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

Try everything. Be willing to go out of your comfort zone. Be humble and don’t be afraid to stumble. Be assertive and take chances. Put yourself out there because if you don’t someone else will!

More about Leslie:

Website: Active Eating Advice by Leslie
Twitter: @lesliebonci #ActiveAdvice
Instagram: @boncilj
Facebook : Leslie Bonci
LinkedIn: Leslie Bonci
Google+: Leslie Bonci



Thanks Leslie! Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!



Monday, June 19, 2017

Dietitians Credentials, Certifications & Designations

Since there are so many things that dietitians do, I figured it was also useful to share the additional certifications/credentials/designations that they may have. I will continue to add to this list, include links, and give a bit of information on each. For now, let me know what I've missed. Do you know what any of these stand for?

RD
RDN
LDN
APD
MBA
MPH
PhD
RCC
CDE
CNSC
NM/CNM
RSSW
SCOPE
IBCLC
MPP
CEDRD
CTDP
CSSD
MSc
MEd
MPH
CPT
CSCS
CSG
MHSc
MScA
MHS
MAHN

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

What RDs Do: Sally Twellman, RDN

SALLY TWELLMAN
LIFE & WELLNESS COACH
for something nutrishus


Like many dietitians, Sally focuses on health and happiness. This reminds me that we're not aiming for restrictive, but sustainable ways of eating and as Sally brings up, our relationship with food. Once again, she wants to clear up that we're not the food police! Where does that come from anyway? With experience in nutrition and coaching, it seems fitting that her blog looks at the 'pursuit of wholeness'. Her private practice came about due to changes in life circumstances (aka kids), which I can relate to.

Why did you become a RD?

To be honest, because I was obsessed with food; Eating it, controlling it and restricting it. But during my journey towards becoming a dietitian and after in my career, I healed my relationship with food and my body and now help others do the same.

What area of dietetics do you work in?

Private Practice: Health and Wellness

How would you explain what you do?

I help people change their relationship with food, love their body and create a healthy, happy life.

What are your ‘typical’ daily/weekly tasks?

My days changes, but typically I see about 2-5 clients in a day, create content for my blog and social media channels or do other administrative work.

What has been your career path?

I worked as a clinical dietitian for 5 years before deciding to stay home full time with my children. I stayed home for about 3 years, then decided to start my private practice, which is primarily online or phone consults.

What advanced education or special training do you have?

Besides getting my RD, I became a life coach to give me extra habit modification skills.

In an ideal world, what does the industry look like 5 years from now?

I want to see more RDs killing it in the online space. We are the experts in food and health and we should be leading the nutrition and wellness conversation.

What misinformation about RDs would you like to clear up?

That we are the food police.

What would you like people to know about RDs?

That we are the most qualified nutrition and wellness experts.

What are challenges you encounter as a RD?

Not having a flexible mindset about helping people make real changes in their lives. When I first started my practice, I was stuck in the old expert mindset of change, aka telling my clients what to do. Then I found that my clients really started making more fundamental changes when I asked them questions, met them where they were and helped them make small incremental changes in their lives.

What do people think that you do for a living?

Help people lose weight.

What makes RDs unique/different from other nutrition/wellness professionals?

We have a scientific knowledge and background.

What is your favourite meal?

I love having Pizza on friday nights with my family!

What tip(s) would you give to our readers?

Start where you are now and focus on making small changes and build on your success. Whatever your goal is, become aware of one small thing you can change, and change that consistently for 1-2 weeks and then add to it. Also, every change must happen from a place of self love and self-respect, when you start there, the actions that will get you to your goal will fall into place.

More about Sally:

Website: www.sallytwellman.com
Facebook: Sally Twellman - Coach
Instagram: @sallytwellmanrdn
Pinterest: Sally Twellman



Thanks Sally! Find out more about What RDsDo.

If you're a dietitian that would like to be featured, email me for the details!